11-10-2012

High-Tech natural stones: new forms of expression for floors and walls

Porcelain Tile, Stone,

Ariostea,

A production process based on the natural process of rock formation preserves the morphological and semantic properties of stone in Ariostea High-Tech stone look porcelain stoneware floors, while at the same time creating additional room for interpretation



High-Tech natural stones: new forms of expression for floors and walls 
 
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When natural processes are reproduced to create new materials, the result is always fascinating emergence of new visual codes.
Inspired by a design concept harmoniously blending technical qualities with aesthetic properties, the resulting materials and spaces will be receptive and ready to convey unusual compositions to the sight and touch. This positive energy emerging from the effect of new lights and lines allows customers and designers to come up with a great variety of new solutions.
The qualities inherent in stone, for instance, acquire greater potential when the processes of rock formation in nature are reproduced. These stylistic connotations clearly emerge in the process of production of Ariostea’s stone-look high-tech porcelain stoneware floors.

Processing and aggregation of different stones does not eliminate the iconic and communicative features of individual raw materials , and their evocative impact is preserved.
What we see is a regeneration of content, heterogeneous evolution of forms: not an expressive synthesis but a new start.
The certainty of efficiency is thus combined with creativity and a drive to imagine and re-modulate everyday settings and landscapes, covered with surfaces with sensorial qualities conveying the essence of the long process of natural formation, while at the same time reflecting the results of technological intervention which has made them aesthetically refined and unique.
The process starts with Nature and shows the mark of human beings passing through the environment, of our ability to regenerate matter through technology and our ability to interpret it.

Marco Privato


Captions

1. Primary School, Dietach, Austria. Mag. Johann Schindlauer - Architekt.
Floors and walls: Pietra piasentina, Ariostea High-Tech natural stones

2. Omega House, Saint Petersburg, Russia. Mamoshin architectural studios.
Floors and walls: Green Quarzite stone, Ariostea High-Tech natural stones

3. DZS Bookstore, Ljubljana, Slovenia.
Floors and walls: Porfido - Ariostea High-Tech natural stones, IRIDIUM brightly coloured porcelain stoneware for floor and wall surfaces

4. Parma Airport, Italy. Design: Antonella Luberti.
Floors and walls: Cardoso, - Ariostea High-Tech natural stones

5. Salt Museum, Salins-les-Bains, Jura, France.
Design: SCP Malcotti-Roussey (Michel Malcotti and Catherine Roussey), Thierry Gheza Architect. Photos: © Nicolas Waltefaugle

6. Funen Blok K, Amsterdam, the Netherlands. Design: NL Architects.
Photos: Raoul Kramer, Erik en Petra Hesm, Marieke Kijkt

7. Josephine Baker School, La Courneuve, Paris (France).
Design: Dominique Coulon & Associés, Architectes (Dominique Coulon, Olivier Nicollas). Photos: © Eugeni Pons

8. Hotel Akraion, Athens, Greece. Iakovos Papageorgiou SA
Floors and walls: Pietra di barge - Ariostea High-Tech natural stones, Rovere Chiaro – High-Tech woods

9. Crescent Wing of the Sainsbury Centre for Visual Arts, UEA, Norwich, UK.
Credits: Oxyman - Creative Commons 2.0

10. Omega House, Saint Petersburg, Russia. Mamoshin architectural studios.
Floors and walls: Green Quarzite stone, Ariostea High-Tech natural stones


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